Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 28, 2016

Cuba Day 3

This is a day at sea. Santiago de Cuba is at the southernmost end of Cuba. Havana is at the northernmost end. We’ll arrive in Havana in the morning and spent several days there. But today we’re at sea. I plan to attend a lecture on the history of cigars so help with my research for my next book. I’ve gone to dance lessons each day and will go to the salsa lesson this afternoon. I also plan to work on my book today in a shaded spot on one of the outdoor aft decks.

This has been a terrific cruise so far. Yesterday was a full day of learning about Cuba history. I look forward to spending time in other Cuban towns, especially Havana.

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1642The Plymouth Colony Court heard a case brought against Edward Mitchell and Edward Preston for “lewd & sodomitical practices tending to sodomy.”

1656 – The New Haven Colony (now Connecticut) mandated the death penalty for both women and men for acts “against nature,” as well as for masturbation and anal sex among heterosexual couples. The New Haven Colony also applied the death penalty for adultery. These laws remained in effect for the next ten years until 1665 when New Haven Colony joined Connecticut and came under Connecticut law which specified the death penalty for “man lying with man” and adultery

1971 – The New York Times publishes a front-page story with the headline “More Homosexuals aided to become Heterosexual”

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 27, 2016

We arrived in Santiago de Cuba this morning. The cruise from Montego Bay to Santiago was pretty awful. We – and nearly everyone else – were horribly seasick. Regina and I had taken salsa lessons, the only ones to do so. By the end neither of us could do anything but run for our cabin. Shout out for Dramamine! It did the job quickly and we were able to keep our dinners. Others weren’t so lucky….

The cool thing about this boat is that it’s small for a cruise ship – 1200. The larger ones apparently aren’t able to pull into the small ports of Cuba. There are 120 of us on the Al and Chuck Travel trip, 90 gay men and 30 lesbians. I’ve already received an invitation to stay with a couple of the men in Rehoboth, Delaware!

Random notes about Cuba that we learned from the University of Havana professors who are our guides:

People line up at the banks. They’re allowed to go in only one at a time. The doors lock in-between visitors.

Santiago was founded in 1550 and is a hub of African culture. We went to the AfroCuban Cultural Center for several mini-lectures and a stunning dance troop. We were invited to dance with them for the last two songs, so I was on my feet! Loved it! The woman who runs the Center, Dr. Martha Jackson, told us that Cubans are trying to build bridges, not burn them.

We visited San Juan Hill which memorializes the Spanish American War and Teddy Roosevelt. That was the first battle in which there were actual attacks by air – hot air balloons!

We went to Revolutionary Square where there is a huge monument to machetes which was the weapon of choice in the 1878 war. There’s also a statue of Antonio Maceo who was killed in battle.

Cuba has the longest life expectancy of any 3rd world county, 76 for men, 80 for women. There is one doctor for every 260 people and the docs make house calls. In fact, medicine is Cuba’s largest export! They train doctors here then send them throughout the would. Over 250 were in Africa during the Ebola virus outbreak; and Cuba has a vaccine cure for people with lung cancer!

We visited the rum factory that was the original Bacardi family factory. They left (read run out of) Cuba in the early 1900s and took their license with them so the Bacardi name is not allowed to be used in Cuba.

In a way it seems like utopia here: 95% of all of the people own their homes (given to them by the government); all food and needs are provided but by voucher so quantities are limited; all education including college through the professions is free; all medical care is free; everyone has a job; the police do not carry guns and neither does anyone else. Crime is very low; Sixty percent of Cuba is run by women and gays, both of whom are protected classes.

Havana is the capitol of Cuba now but Santiago was initially. There are Three million people in Havana.

Cuba was not discovered by Columbus; it was merely an encounter. Natives were already here.

Many of the beautiful homes of the wealthy were abandoned by their owners in the 1950’s and early 60’s. Those houses are now schools or museum or stores though people are not able to buy very much. The average income is 14 Cuban Pesos a month.

Bars are on every window and many places have walls and barbed wire. I don’t know why. A leftover from the old days? Everything seems to have stopped in the 1950s.

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1557, Italy – Benvenuto Cellini charged with sodomy

1989 – The U.S.S.R. reports the case of twenty-nine infants and six mothers who all contracted AIDS in the same hospital through a single unsterile syringe that was used over and over again

2001 – Two female characters on Buffy the Vampire Slayer share a kiss. It was the first realistic lesbian relationship on TV

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 26, 2016

I’m writing as I sit with a cup of coffee on the deck of the Gloucestershire Hotel in Montego Bay, overlooking the Caribbean. Regina and I arrived in Montego Bay around 3 PM yesterday, went through their Customs, then taxied to our hotel. Linda Friedman, Jill Bulmash and Susan Gordon along with 25 other Villages (Florida) women were sitting on the front patio as we arrived so there was a delightful welcoming committee for us (though not intentional).

The hotel is very Caribbean, very tropical. The people are lovely and the room is large though nothing about the hotel is elegant. We have a good room that faces the water, with two double (not queen) beds and a tiny bathroom.

After getting settled, we walked into town. Very few shops and restaurants were open because it was election day in Jamaica. They’re electing the country’s leaders.

Montego Bay is a trashy town. Literally, trash is everywhere, the streets are crazy busy, and people drive on the wrong side of the street in the wrong side of the car. But everyone speaks and writes in English which they learn in school. While people are very nice, this is not a place to which I would want to return. I see nothing fun nor romantic about it, so this stopover was enough.

At diner in the hotel last night, I met about 15 gay men from Palm Springs and one from Atlanta with whom I have several mutual friends. This is a gay cruise with many gay men and us 30 lesbians! It’s already fun and we haven’t left for the ship yet!

This morning we will eat the hotel’s magnificent breakfast spread, then go to the ship around noon. It’s a cool day here, not much humidity, and Montego Bay is waking up. So am I…

On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1973 – Gay playwright, Noel Coward, dies in Jamaica at the age of 73

1975 – After the local district attorney’s office rules that there are no county laws preventing two people of the same-sex from getting married, Boulder, Colorado county clerk Clela Rorex issues a marriage license to two gay men, Dave McCord and Dave Zamora. It is the first same-sex marriage license issued in the United States. She says in a statement, “I don’t profess to be knowledgeable about homosexuality or even understand it, but it’s not my business why people get married. No minority should be discriminated against.”

1977 – First time openly lesbian and gay people at the White House

1985 – A 4-4 tie vote in the U.S. Supreme Court effectively overturns an Oklahoma law that would have banned homosexuals, or those defending or “promoting” the homosexual “lifestyle”, from teaching in the state’s public schools

1990 – Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt wins the Academy Award for Best Feature-Length Documentary. It is the second Oscar for gay filmmaker Rob Epstein, who received the first one six years previously, for The Times of Harvey Milk

2000 – Hilary Swank won Best Actress Oscar for portrayal of Brandon Teena in Boy Don’t Cry

 2007 – Jewish Theological Seminary of America begins accepting openly LGB candidates

2013 – Gay pride flag flown by Alan Lowenthal (D), in Washington DC.

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 25, 2016

On my way to Cuba! Regina and I are in the Miami airport awaiting our flight to Montego Bay, Jamaica where we’ll spend the night and board the cruise ship tomorrow for Cuba. One reason why I wanted to go to Cuba now is that I wanted to see it before it opened to US tourism which will happen in July, I believe. The other is that my next book will be an historical novel about lesbians of Key West beginning in the 1880s and the cigar business. I’ve done a great deal of research already but there is some information I can get only in Cuba. But for tonight, we’ll get to Montego Bay around 2:30 and meet 28 other women from The Villages in Florida at our hotel. The girls will “do” Montego Bay tonight!

Yesterday I wrote about internalized homophobia of some politicians and it made me think about my own. I was in the closet for 20 years, from age 11 to 31. I referred to myself in the third person as “that damned queer.” In college I verbally harassed the three gay men I knew (and probably made their lives very uncomfortable) because I didn’t’ want anyone to think I was just like them. I saw that often among college students who were adjudicated to me due to their anti-gay behaviors. Those in the closet were the loudest – and often the most vicious – of perpetrators, screaming, it seemed, at their own secret gay selves.

The closet is a terrible place in which lives are wasted. How awful to not be one’s authentic self, to hate oneself so much that the best one can called oneself is “that damned queer.” I know first-hand that it’s not easy to embrace oneself if one perceives self as so different from loved ones that one fears abandonment and rejection. I did everything and anything to appear “normal,” to be just like my family and friends, include get married, and I lived a life devoid of any authenticity. (The one thing for which I remain deeply grateful is that my marriage produced my two beautiful children). But my heart and soul and spirit were in constant pain, and the anger I often felt overtook me often.

Today, thanks to CoDA and to my own willingness to own responsibility of my actions and feelings, both the internalized homophobia and the anger are things of the past. I remember them but keep them where they belong…in the bowels of my history of the journey that brought me to this grounded place today. I’m deeply grateful to my Higher Power and to those who journey beside me. Life is good indeed…

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1982 – Wisconsin becomes the first state in the U.S. to enact a statewide gay rights statute

1983 – Tennessee Williams dies at the age of 71 in his suite at the Hotel Elysee in New York City.

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 24, 2016

This political season is either nauseating or humorous, sometimes both at the same time. I have no doubt that if any of the Republicans are elected, life for LGBT people will likely become more challenging. I’m always leery of people like Marco Rubio who protest too much about LGBT people. It makes me wonder what (or who) is in their closet??? And then I read about these guys:

President James Buchanan. Pundits speculate on when the United States will elect a gay President, though few realize we already did! James Buchanan, the 15th President, never married. He did, however, live with Senator William Rufus King for a good portion of his adult life. Andrew Jackson referred to them as gay, and Governor Aaron Brown referred to them as a married couple. Surviving letters detail their intimate relationship, though Buchanan’s family destroyed a good portion of their correspondence due to its scandalous nature.

Abe Lincoln’s sexuality remains the subject of furious debate. While no gay rumors followed him during his lifetime, surviving private letters do hint at several same-sex relationships. He never warmed to women, but did spent lots of time with male companions and wrote at least one poem about sex with men. Letters also reveal he frequently slept in the same bed with bodyguard David Derickson. Hotly disputed are papers discovered in an apartment Lincoln once shared with friend Joshua Speed, which detail a sexual relationship.

Edgar Hoover. The tyrannical ex-FBI head blackmailed and spied on celebrities and political rivals he considered homosexual. The great irony is that Hoover himself was gay, as numerous friends and associates like Roy Cohn and Ethel Merman attest. His long-term boyfriend, Clyde Tolson, was his right hand man. Rumors that Hoover was also a drag queen remain unconfirmed.

So, Marco Rubio, what’s your story? Why DO you protest so much? Hide though such folks might, sooner or later the truth is always revealed…

And now to pack for my trip to Cuba tonight!

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1954, UK – Churchill’s Cabinet discusses homosexuality asking, “ could we not limit publicity for homosexuality, as was done for divorce?”

1995 – Olympic-medal-winning diver Greg Louganis announces that he’s HIV-Positive

2004 – President George W. Bush announces that he supports a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage.

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 23, 2016

For much of my working life I had zero balance: I lived on campus as a faculty in residence, walked the ¼ mile to my office across campus, ate, worked out, even socialized on campus. I was a 24/7 on-call UCLA Bruin. Occasionally I’d escape for an evening at the Hollywood Bowl or a family visit, and even left campus once in a while for a work-related trip.

I was often invited to sit on conference panels about balance because people knew I had none. I also had no significant romantic relationships. And the crazy thing was I loved my life! I loved living on campus with a thousand of my best 19-year old friends; I loved the productivity that came with it (over 100 articles, several books, and many chapters in the books of other authors); and I loved the gifts that came with being of service for so many precious young people. I felt fulfilled and purposeful and successful.

I’ll share one of my ridiculous thoughts with you: one of the reasons I worked 24/7 was because what if we LGBT people were suddenly given our full civil rights and I was on vacation??? What if I missed it??? I had to be present to make sure I was there when it happened! How crazy was that????  So I worked hard, appreciated the privilege of my situation, and kept up the crazy pace. When I retired from UCLA, I was the senior associate dean of students, director of the M.Ed. in Student Affairs, a full professor, director of the LGBT Center, and a faculty in residence. And I was often exhausted. It was time to go…

My dear friend Rev. Mike Piazza writes a column called Liberating Word. Earlier this month he wrote: It is okay to let the world turn without you for a day or two if you need. In fact, it might be better for everyone if you did. When your burden is so great that to take on something else might bring you harm and can cause you to lash out in ways that aren’t constructive then it’s okay not to take it on today. Perhaps your load will be lighter tomorrow. 

Yesterday, Kelly, Mom, and my sister Barbra had a picnic lunch and a harbor cruise on my boat. It was a Monday and no other boaters were out. We just floated on the water with no place to go and nothing to do but take in the company, the scenery, and the fresh air. It was a perfect day, one I never would have had in my working life, certainly not on a Monday! If I had takensome time to rejuvenate occasionally, my work would have still been there, my students would still need me, and the LGBT rights movement would still be moving forward. Everyone, especially me, would have benefitted from my taking a break once in a while.

Yesterday was a gift. We women enjoyed one another, enjoyed our surroundings, and shared tears and precious thoughts of Sherry. It was a perfect day of balance, a day of love. Try it in your life…soon!

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1977 – After a television producer cancels plans to develop a weekly series around her, Anita Bryant complains to the press that she is being “blacklisted” in Hollywood because of her crusade against homosexuals

1990 – First Lesbian organization for Chinese-Speaking Women in Asia called, Women Chih Chian, formed I Taiwan.

2011 – Hawaii’s Gov. Linda Lingle vetoed a civil union law in 2010 but her successor, Gov. Neil Abercrombie, makes it the first law he signs on this day.

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 22, 2016

Such a beautiful day yesterday… Kelly and Dooney and I drove from Palm Springs to Ventura to spend couple of days here before I leave for Cuba. We went over to the boat to clean it and prepare it for today’s lunch party with my mother and sister Barbra. As we were cleaning, Kelly stopped what she was doing and looked at me. “I feel Sherry so strongly here,” she said. Sher loved the water, loved being on her own boat, putting around the harbor just a short distance from where we were. I miss Sher so much that I can barely say the words. All I can do is let he tears flow and feel her close to me, my guardian angel…

We finished our work ad left the marina to take a walk through downtown Ventura to do some very special shopping which I will not share here just yet. Suffice it to say that my heart is overflowing with love for this precious woman, my Kelly, and I’m grateful beyond words for her sweet presence in my life.

And now to prepare for today’s lunch cruise…

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1892 – Popular openly bisexual poet Edna St. Vincent Millay is born

1979 – Studio 54 throws a gala fifty-second birthday party for closeted gay attorney and former McCarthy aid Roy Cohn. The event draws several hundred of the city’s luminaries including Donald Trump, Barbara Walters, members of both Democratic and Republican parties and most of the city’s elected officials, As the right-hand-man of Joseph McCarthy, Roy Cohn targeted homosexuals. But he himself was a closeted homosexual, denying his homosexuality, and later, denying that he had AIDS.

1987 – Andy Warhol dies at the age of 58.

2007, Netherlands – Gerda Verbug is the first open lesbian elected to government. She becomes the minister of Agriculture, Nature, and Food Quality.

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 21, 2016

Kelly and I went to the L-Fund Dance in Palm Springs last night. There are several interesting things about the L-Fund: it raises money for lesbians in need in Coachella Valley; 100% for the funds are dispensed since all officers are volunteers; the dance was co-sponsored by local businesses and organizations so 100% of the funds raised last night will go directly to those in need; and it is absolutely the most racially diverse LGBT group I’ve ever seen. It was a fun event with about 200 women. I extend tremendous congratulations to the organizers. A great evening! If you’re looking for a worthy, responsible organization to whom to donate, make it the L-Fund. Their Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/Palmspringslfund/?fref=ts.

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1903 – New York City police conduct the first recorded raid on a gay bathhouse in the US, the Ariston Hotel Baths, which had been in operation since 1897. Twenty-six men were arrested and 12 brought to trial on sodomy charges; 7 men received sentences ranging from 4 to 20 years in prison

1976 – A Detroit jury awards more than $200,000 in damages to a man who contends that he was “turned into” a homosexual by a 1975 automobile accident in which his car was rear-ended by another vehicle.

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 20, 2016

It feels good to be back with Kelly and Dooney in Palm Springs. I truly feel like this is home for me. I do enjoy Ventura and spending time with my mother. At nearly 90, she’s still up and running well and she’s great company. But there’s a comfort that I feel both in this place and the Sequim, WA house with this person and this dog.

I struggled with the concept of home for decades because I never felt like I belonged anywhere. (My mother’s house tody is not the one in which I grew up. That house is 3000 miles away and I left there in 1965.) I’ve been reading Brene Brown’s Daring Greatly. The last chapter in the book describes the difference between belonging and fitting in. I realize that I was always trying to fit in without really belonging, Belonging is that for which I’ve searched, which has eluded me for my whole life. Belonging is where one is part of a larger group (friends, family, work, whatever space) simply because one is loved and valued as a member of that group without having to do or change anything about oneself. Fitting in is trying to be like others (on so many levels) for approval and connection. I have always fit in; I have never belonged.

I fit in when my thoughts and feelings and actions mirror yours; I fit in when our politics are identical and I do not verbalize disagreement; I fit in when I do everything I can to be like you and be liked by you. I can speak the party line and even begin to believe it. More specifically, I fit in with my family without having beem my authentic self because I didn’t want to be rejected or abandoned for identifying myself as young lesbian in 1958 (and for the next 20 years). I didn’t belong to family or social groups because my authentic self was hiding, afraid of being found out, afraid of being rejected by anyone and everyone. I even got married to fit in. Later in my work life, I fit in well.  I did everything I could to belong to my profession and my colleagies: I published articles and books like crazy, did courageous and new things that enhanced students’ lives, developed programs for engagement, created many innovative concepts that are still in use today even though I’m retired. And I acknowledge that received lovely recognitions over the years for the work I did. I fit in beautifully. But when invitations to dinners or parties or gatherings large or small were issued, I wasn’t on the list. I didn’t belong.

I’ve been okay with just fitting in. I’ve always known that I was on the periphery of groups, never really part of. Today I own my role in just fitting in. My self-esteem often kept me from engaging too deeply, fearing that nasty old sense of rejection if I shared too much or allowed myself to be too present. I’ve envied Kelly’s ability to belong to her AA groups and friends. She’s loved and accepted for no other reason than that she is Kelly in all of her glorious authenticity. For all my years of CoDA, I’ve not allowed myself to connect with CoDA people beyond the meetings. (In all honesty, I felt like the meetings were therapeutic, which they are for me, and socializing with a therapist is just wrong. A tad warped, I know, but that’s how I viewed it.)

Today I finally feel that sense of belonging. I have finally allowed myself to be authentic in this place and with this person and with a few chosen friends. I allow myself the gift of being vulnerable and being present. My assignment for myself now is to reach out, to expand those places in which I can finally feel that I belong rather than just fitting in. This house, this woman, this dog…a good place to start and I’m grateful beyond words…

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1982 – An article in the medical journal Lancet suggests that there is evidence to show inhaling poppers damages the immune system

2004 – Victoria Dunlap, Republican county clerk of rural Sandoval County, New Mexico, begins issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples, citing lack of legal grounds for denial

2004 – King Norodom Sihanouk, constitutional monarch of Cambodia, declared that he thought his country should legalize same-sex marriage. He said that he reached this conclusion after watching footage of same-sex couples marry in San Francisco. He also stated that transvestites should be well-treated in Cambodia. (He’s also never been married. Just sayin’…rs)

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni

Being 69: A Year in the Life of a Fun Old Lesbian – February 19, 2016

I’m sitting in the Miami Airport awaiting my flight back to Palm Springs. I feel good about the hard work we did at the University of Miami this week. I facilitated a two-day strategic planning session with the Student Affairs division as they initiate their LGBT Center development. And the DragOut show last night was a total hoot!

I’ve been reflecting on my road from here (Miami) to there (Palm Springs). I lived here, in North Miami Beach, for most of my childhood, leaving at age 18 to go to the University of Florida. Two years later, in 1967, my family moved to Los Angeles. Between here and there I’ve lived one heck of a life. In a nutshell: music major at UF, closeted lesbian, married, two children, lost children when I came out, activist, homeless, AIDS activist/FL health dept., masters and doctoral degree from the University of North Florida, director University of Michigan LGBT Center, founded Lavender Graduation, wrote first draft of national standards and guidelines for LGBT work on campuses, first publications, director UCLA LGBT Center, children returned to me as adults, grandchildren, more publications, many local and national recognitions, founder UCLA M.Ed in Student Affairs program, way too many relationships over the years, found twelve-step programs, met Kelly, retired, lost my dad, traveled the world, lost my precious sister Sherry, engaged to Kelly. And through it all, my golf just sucks…

I am deeply appreciative of both the highs and the lows of my life. Today my heart is full with gratitude for my body and my health, for the love that abounds around me, and for the gifts the Universe continues to bestow upon me. I miss my sister beyond words but she’s my guardian angel and is with me always, and I share such beautiful love in my life with Kelly, with my sweet friends, with my family. Life is good indeed… and tomorrow begins MY time of year: Pisces Time!

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On this day in LGBT history (from QUIST, Lavender Effect, and/or Wikipedia. (If you are unsure about accuracy, please do your research and let me know. Thanks!)

1974 – The Pat Collins Show, a morning program on New York’s WCBS, broadcasts live from the Continental Baths. The station only receives one complaint about the episode

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I encourage you to write your stories. If you’d like to see your memoir and stories in print, let’s work together. I can help you self-publish your work. If this interests you, please see my website at http://purpledistinctions.com/self_publishing.html

Write your story! Now is good!

Warmly,

Ronni